Circuit breaker diaries part one

The city of Adelaide declared a 6-day long ‘circuit breaker’ lockdown as of 12.00 am Thursday 19 November, following the discovery of 18 cases of COVID-19 in the state. I did a week of groceries with my family and I was pleased to see that calm and polite shoppers were perusing the aisles of our local Woolworths. I was displeased to see the sensationalist news reports on Wednesday night suggesting that panic was ensuing in Adelaide and that the shelves were bare. This simply was not true, at least for our suburb, but I suppose doom and gloom is far more captivating for some than an orderly society.

[image credit: Adelaide City webcams]

Thursday, the first day of lockdown, was a warm 36 degree Celsius day. I usually start the day with a long walk with my family, and the temptation to go outside was strong. One family member is permitted to leave the house each day to collect essential supplies. I may volunteer to be that person later this week in order to keep my Vitamin D levels up.

On day one I’ve read a book, played the piano, and wrote some more of a long-form personal essay I’m creating. My husband tinkered in his studio and my one-year old daughter and I sang some nursery rhymes and played with her toys when she wasn’t napping. I wish I could’ve taken her to the playground which she adores. I’ve got to keep her moving because she is highly active and I predict she’ll get restless over the coming days without some outdoor activity.

[image credit: Adelaide City webcams]

An official update from the South Australian government stated that:

“In order to protect the elderly, the vulnerable and the entire South Australian community, we need a circuit breaker. From midnight tonight, a six-day initial stage will include a series of wide ranging, comprehensive restrictions. This will put a pause on South Australia, so we can stay ahead of the virus. The circuit breaker will reduce movement in the community, which will also give SA Health contact tracers the opportunity to identify and isolate close contacts relating to the Parafield cluster.

During this circuit breaker, people will only be able to leave the home for the following reasons:

– essential work
– one family member per household per day will be able to leave to go to the nearest grocery store, pharmacy or petrol station
– to seek medical help or in an emergency
– to undertake COVID-19 testing
– to feed animals in agricultural areas
– end of life visits through organised arrangements
– face masks should be worn when outside of the home for any reason

While this situation is concerning and challenging for the community, please remain calm and play your part in stopping the spread of COVID-19 in South Australia.”

[image credit: Adelaide City webcams]

I’m grateful to live in a community concerned for the welfare of others. I’m positive that South Australia will have this under control soon.

I’m thinking of my fellow South Aussies and everyone in the world affected by the repercussions of this virus. I want to focus on the positives so feel free to read my social media posts and blog for uplifting content.

Goodness knows there’s a lot of sensationalism in the world right now.

2 Replies to “Circuit breaker diaries part one”

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